frindle.gif
Source: Google ImagesFrindleby Andrew ClementsABC Storybook projectAnne Heien




Anticipation Activities
Prediction Picture Walk
RL 5.5: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas, fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
RL 5.7: Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
Theme: comprehension, fluency
Even though this book is a chapter book, it still contains pictures. There are pictures on the beginning page, page 9, 18, 30, 36, 46, 50, 64, 79, 86, and 102. Each of these pictures contains a caption. The class will get a prediction sheet. On this sheet will have the captions listed on the left hand side. After discussing and looking at the pictures, students will make their predictions about what will happen in the story. Students should be able to make predictions about main characters, setting, and plot. This worksheet can also be put on a smartboard so the class can work on it together.

Assess: Look at each student's prediction sheet. Keep them until the end of the book. Have the students reflect on how their predictions turned out. Note the differences and the similarities.

Web Out Ideas
RL 5.2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
Theme: Comprehension, fluency, vocabulary
The main character, Nick Allen, is a fifth grade boy that is full of ideas. One of his big ideas is the plot for this book. As a class, we will come up with some big ideas. Using a web worksheet, we will be able to map out these ideas. I purposefully left out the lines in the worksheet so that the students may make their own connections. Students should have different looking webs.

Assess: Have some of the students share some of their big ideas with the classroom. Collect the worksheets.

Vocabulary Analysis
RL 5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
Theme: Vocabulary, Phonetics, Technology
I developed a list of challenging words that I have found in Frindle. With this list I made a Quizlet set of flashcards. As a class, we will use the smartboard and play word scatter. In this game, the words need to be dragged to their definitions. As we read Frindle, we will keep track of the vocabulary words we pass.

Assess: Use the other activities that Quizlet has to offer to help you assess. There are flashcards and other word games to play. Also, keep track of when and where these words fall in the text. Observe if your students comprehend and acknowledge them as vocabulary when you reach each word.

Building Knowledge

Pen vs. Frindle Debate
RL 5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL 5.3: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
Theme: Comprehension, Fluency
A major conflict in the book is whether or not it is appropriate to use the word “frindle” as a replacement for the word “pen.” In order to better illustrate this point, the class will have a debate. Split the class into two groups. One group is Team Pen, while the other is Team Frindle. Each team will debate with the other about which word is appropriate to describe the name of a utensil that uses ink to write. Have the class draw from examples in the book. Keep track of all of the points made.
Assess: The teacher should observe and take notes during and before the debate. Therefore, they can assess how the classroom is working as a whole. Also, after the debate, the teacher should have the students reflect on all of the points that were made. They could write a journal entry or have a classroom discussion.

Our Class Dictionary
RL 5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
Theme: Vocabulary, Phonetics, Technology
In Frindle, Nick Allen creates another name for the word “pen.” This word eventually gets put into the dictionary. In this activity, students will make up their own word to describe an object that is already out there. We will use these new words to create a new dictionary. We will use Zooburst, which allows the class to create an interactive pop-up dictionary.


Assess: The teacher should examine the word choice and creativity of each student. The teacher could show the dictionary to another classroom or another teacher. Furthermore, the teacher could have the students create sentences with their new words. An example of the assessment from the book could be having the students formulate their own advertisements or slogans for their new words.

Compare and Contrast-Nick Allen and Mrs. Granger
RL 5.3: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
Theme: Comprehension, Fluency, Vocabulary
Nick Allen and Mrs. Granger are the two main characters of this story. While both characters seem to be completely different, they have some similarities. Both characters share traits of persistence and passion for example. As a class we will analyze the similarities and differences between both main characters. I have prepared a worksheet that I can use with the class on the smartboard.

Assess: Teachers should analyze and observe their students answers. They should note the thoughts that are concrete and abstract. Also, they should observe contributions made by the class.

Consolidation Activities

Timeline Travel
RL 5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL 5.5: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
RL 5.6: Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
Theme: Technology, Comprehension
Using a Glogster, students will come up with a timeline of the story. With the timeline the students will want to highlight: important events of the story and the plot. Students may want to use quotations or images to better illustrate their timeline. After a timeline is created, groups will compare timelines with other groups. As a follow-up, make a timeline that centers along Mrs. Granger’s path through the story. Then, compare and contrast the two.

http://annehe1428.glogster.com/false/
Bloom's Taxonomy Questions
RL 5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL 5.2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
RL 5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
Theme: Comprehension, Fluency
The students will get a selection of questions that can be used to assess the text. These questions cover all of the elements of Bloom’s taxonomy. They can be answered with literature groups, or in a whole classroom setting. These questions give a review and summary of the story.


Group Questions
1. What is Mrs. Granger’s famous “battle cry” that all her former students remember?
2. What question does Nick ask Mrs. Granger on the first day of class to stall the lesson? How does she outsmart him?
3. List the three important events that lead to Nick’s big idea: renaming a pen “a frindle.”
4. What exactly does Mrs. Granger mean when she says that “dog” means dog because we all agree it does?
5. Why do some students want to stay after school and be punished by Mrs. Granger? Why do they consider it a “badge of honor”?
6. If “ain’t” is not a proper word, how can it be in the dictionary, as Nick points out? What is Nick trying to prove when he brings this point up with Mrs. Chatham, the principal?
7. Imagine that you are the reporter from the Wakefield Gazette, trying to get the scoop on the new word “frindle.” What questions would you ask Mrs. Granger? How would you convince the principal to give you the real story?
8. Bud Lawrence wants to own the trademark for the word, “frindle.” What does he plan to do with it? How can someone own the rights to a word? Explain how this is different from owning a bike or a pair of sneakers, or even a pet dog.
9. When the reporter from the TV station asks Nick “What’s next for you and your new word?” Nick replies that “frindle belongs to everyone now.” How can a word belong to everyone? What does someone “do” with a word that belongs to them?
10. How does the experience of inventing a new word and becoming a celebrity affect Nick? Why does he think twice about testing out his new idea: protesting the poor food in the cafeteria?
11. In her letter to Nick (which he opens later, after he’s in college), Mrs. Granger says: “A person can watch the sunset, but he cannot slow it down or stop it or make it go backward.” What do you think this observation has to do with Nick’s word?
12. Why does Mrs. Granger “expect to hear remarkable things” about Nick in the future? Can you predict—based on his creativity and his restless challenging of rules and conventions—what kind of remarkable things he might go on to do?
13. Can you recall the early parts of the story and Mrs. Granger’s “war” against Nick and his new word? Now that you know what her real intentions were—to intentionally make herself “the bad guy”—try to imagine what she was thinking when she posted her angry notice, or when day after day she kept all those students after school.
14. Do you think Nick really knew what he was getting into when he started spreading the word “frindle”? How did Mrs. Granger—who tried to make obstacles for Nick—realize the possibility of Nick’s new word?

Clements, A. (1996). Frindle. New York: Scholastic Inc.
Assess: Questions apply to the following: Knowledge 1-3, Comprehension 4-6, Application 7-8, Anyalysis 9-10, Synthesis 11-12, Evaluation 13-14. Analyze and reflect on whether or not students comprehended the material.
Finish the Story-Frindle 2
RL 5.6: Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
Theme: Fluency, Vocabulary, Comprehension
A student or group of students will take any character in the story and continue their journey. Students can either write a short story or an outline of how they would write a sequel for their character. Students should reflect on making a connection between the first story and their second story.
Assess: Teachers should have the students split up into groups and tell each other how their sequel was. Groups will then pick out one of the sequels and act it out to the rest of the class.